December 1, 2014

New revelations on dark matter and fossil neutrinos

Planck collaboration, which involves notably CNRS, CEA, CNES and several French universities, reveals the results of four years of observations of ESA's Planck Satellite today during the conference in Ferrara (Italy), dedicated to the study of the "Cosmic Microwave Background" (CMB), the oldest light of the Universe.

From 2009 to 2013, Planck satellite observed the CMB. Nowadays, with the complete analysis of the data, the quality of the resulting map is such that the imprints left by the dark matter and the primordial neutrinos, among other, are clearly visible.

Early, in 2013 the map of the light intensity variations has been revealed, showing the places where the matter was 380,000 years after the Big-Bang. Thanks to the measurements of the polarization of this light (for the moment for 4 of the 7 channels), Planck is able to see how this matter moved. Our vision of the primordial Universe becomes more dynamic. This new dimension and the data quality allow us to test numerous parameters of the standard cosmology model. Particularly, they highlight what is the most insubstantial in the Universe: the dark matter and the neutrinos.

 ESA- collaboration Planck, highlighted by Marc-Antoine Miville-Deschenes  ESA- collaboration Planck, highlighted by Marc-Antoine Miville-Deschenes
30 by 30 degrees map of the polarized signal at 353 GHz. The colors map the thermal emission of the dust while the reliefs draw the Galactic magnetic field. Credits: ESA- collaboration Planck, highlighted by Marc-Antoine Miville-Deschenes

Read the complete Press Release about this subject (in French).